Bob Dylan

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Band Summary

Average User Rating 8.46
Total Reviews 5
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
An Argument for Dylan
Venue/Date: Wings Stadium (Kalamazoo, MI)
Concert Date:  
November 8th, 2008
Reviewer: gypsynester

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5.60
What are the chances? Driving along and there you see a big sign flashing "Bob Dylan in concert." He is, after all, truly a living legend. Since I have never seen him and I might not get another chance, I thought I'd be an idiot not to grab this opportunity. Veronica wasn't overly thrilled since she had seen him several times before (her dad is the quintessential old hippy making the annual Dylan pilgrimage). I tried to think of some provocative ways to sell her on the idea of spending a hundred bucks and a couple hours of her life listening to unintelligible lyrics mumbled by a 67 year old man. I tried the living legend idea but she had seen him before, so...as we talked about it, I stumbled on what I think is the real reason for anyone to be interested in seeing Dylan, even if they don't particularly care for his music. Few people in the history of the arts ever make significant changes in the way their medium is executed. Bob Dylan is one of those few. He fundamentally changed the way songs are written, not musically, but lyrically. There is a noticeable difference between songs before and after his influence. Before Dylan, lyrics told stories in a clear, straightforward manner. The use of imagery was mostly confined to the music itself, with melody and chord structure. He changed that. Now it is common for the lyrics to be used as a vehicle to "paint a picture" as much as the feel and form of the music. Bob Dylan had a huge hand in making that happen. This point made an impact on Veronica and now she was actually looking forward to the show (I wisely decided not to remind her that she wouldn't be able to decipher a word the man sings--lest I lose the whole lyrics argument). We arrived just before showtime without tickets and by complete dumb luck got seats in the third row that were somehow overlooked in the advance sales. What can I say, we lead a charmed life. The first thing I noticed upon entering the arena was the crowd. It's been a long, long time since I have been to a big stadium Rock concert but I still remember what it was like...and this wasn't it. I actually felt like one of the younger ones there. This was probably a good thing. No mosh pits, groupies, biker security or clouds of pot smoke to obscure the reason we came. There was, however, a quite large contingency of younger kids from the local college willing to stand though the entire show in exchange for the cheaper ticket prices. Perhaps that's where some secret herbal fires were burning. It did seem like a small whiff drifted by now and then. As for the show itself, it was pretty much what I expected, except that Dylan has reinvented himself as a keyboard player on this tour. He only touched a guitar on a couple songs and used the harmonica mainly to add a little color here and there. The crowd went wild every time he touched the harp though, so it worked. Dylan's been known to do entire shows of songs only a hardcore fan would recognize so we were happy to be graced with some classics like "Highway 61 Revisited", "Like A Rolling Stone", "It's All Over Now Baby Blue", "Maggie's Farm" and "All Along The Watchtower". All nostalgic, bring-you-back-to-a-certain-place-and-time classics. For Veronica, an especially fond memory occurred during "Rainy Day Woman #12 and #35" (huh?, oh yeah, "Everybody Must Get Stoned") remembering her mother's shock that her father was listening to "that song" in front of the children. Daddy easily explained it off as a song about Jesus, which is funny because it's (kinda) true. A fine little childhood memory, that made Veronica smile. It can be a bit off-putting how Dylan never acknowledges his audience, almost like watching a rehearsal. You can see that as good or bad, personally I find something to like in it. The lighting is sparse--you never really get a good look at him, the stage very pared-down. It's almost as if the crowd is an afterthought. I can see how after several decades of performing these songs he might purposely phrase his lyrics so that it doesn't turn into a sing along. It also occurred to me that the college kids (and some of the old hippies) should stop shouting out requests of favorite songs, because it might make him all the LESS likely to play them. Dylan wasn't vibrant, yet he didn't seem like an "old guy", either. As Veronica noted, he "oozed cool". He is after all, as his introduction stated, "the poet laureate of rock 'n roll. The voice of the promise of the 60s counterculture. The guy who forced folk into bed with rock, who donned makeup in the 70s and disappeared into a haze of substance abuse and emerged to find Jesus." And the band kicked ass. David, GypsyNester.com

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Dylan Continues his amazing tour in NE
Venue/Date: Qwest Center Omaha (Omaha, NE)
Concert Date:  
October 26th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

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9.33

Review: Dylan, Costello bring hits, don't miss a beat

BY NIZ PROSKOCIL
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

Seeing a legend like Bob Dylan onstage is reason enough to celebrate.

But the excitement at his Friday night concert was doubled thanks to opening act Elvis Costello.

The two Rock and Roll Hall of Famers treated 7,000 fans at the Qwest Center Omaha to a terrific show that mixed timeless classics with new material.

Costello, 53, is touring solo for the first time in 12 years. He warmed the stage with a 50-minute solo acoustic set that was solid from the start.

Opening with "(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes," he followed with several of his greatest hits, including "Watching the Detectives," "Everyday I Write the Book," "Pump It Up" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding."

Just as enjoyable as his classics were newer songs, including "From Sulfur to Sugar Cane" and "Down Among the Wine and Spirits."

During crowd favorite "Alison," he stepped back from the mike, belting out, "My aim is true."

Costello, who hasn't performed in Omaha since 1982, also sang part of Van Morrison's "Jackie Wilson Said" and closed with "The Scarlet Tide" from the Civil War film "Cold Mountain."Click here to read rest of the review

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
Bob Dylans Concert, the part you could hear, was amazing!
Venue/Date: DCU Center (Worcester, MA)
Concert Date:  
October 2nd, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

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9.11

‘Modern’ Dylan material is some of his best live

Christopher John Treacy By Christopher John Treacy

If Keith Richards’ complexion could sing, it might sound something like Bob Dylan.

Dylan’s basically been on tour for 20 years - it’s enough to take a toll on even the strongest of constitutions.

Now his pipes have degenerated past their 1990s froggy sneer into guttural grumbling that’s barely comprehensible.


Despite this, Dylan’s fan base thrives, and it turned out in full force for Dylan’s DCU Center gig in Worcester last night.

On bluesy jaunts such as opener “Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat,” from 1966’s “Blonde on Blonde,” he got by fairly well, and his five-piece crack band chugged along with a jam-band friendly sound that suited a multitude of material.

But Dylan was rather disappointing on folkie classics such as“Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright.” The song’s a mere shadow of its former glory. Sounding congested, Dylan’s heavily amplified meanderings likely would have split the arena’s foundation if he so much as coughed.

But, the legend’s one of few artists in his age group who shine brightest with newer material. Last night, the swift boogie of “Rollin’ and Tumblin,’ ” an impassioned “Workingman’s Blues #2,” “Highwater,” with its superior banjo and guitar work, and the undeniably romantic “Beyond the Horizon” - all from last year’s “Modern Times” - attested to his genius being very much intact. But, you’ve got to listen closely for subtle shifts in his intonation to make sense of it all.

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Bob is a legend
Venue/Date: Red Rocks Amphitheatre (Morrison, CO)
Concert Date:  
July 22nd, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

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9.30
Dylan rocks on a blues note
Appearance is his first at Red Rocks in more than 20 years
By John Wenzel
Denver Post Staff Writer
Article Last Updated: 07/20/2007 02:28:14 AM MDT

Rock's poet laureate followed his blues muse at Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Thursday, recasting classics and new songs as rollicking, guitar-led rock.

Bob Dylan's sold-out set, the first of two at the historic amphitheater, was also his first at Red Rocks in more than 20 years. In true Dylan fashion, his interaction with the crowd was nonexistent, his performance laser-like.

An excellent and face-meltingly loud set by the Louisville, Ky., act My Morning Jacket kicked off the night, which briefly stalled when rain passed through.

After a lovingly emceed intro, Dylan took the stage with his five-piece band, dressed in a black suit, short neck scarf and gray hat, his group contrasting him in opposite colors.

Without a word he launched into "Rainy Day Women #12 and 35," appropriate in both its title and the singalong friendly, "Everybody must get stoned" - at least judging by the venue's sticky-sweet air.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Boy Dylan Concert Review
Venue/Date: Hersheypark Stadium (Hershey, PA)
Concert Date:  
June 24th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

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8.98
Energetic Dylan electrifies crowd
Monday, June 25, 2007
BY PRASANA WILLIAM
Of The Patriot-News

Which singer makes young girls scream and old men jump for joy? That would be Bob Dylan. Last night's concert at The Star Pavilion at Hersheypark Stadium brought out all generations to enjoy Dylan's timeless music.

Openers Jimmie Vaughn and Lou Ann Barton brought their own Southern charm. Singing a duet to "Sugar Coated Love," the pair was as sweet, smooth, and smoky as barbecue sauce.

But it was Dylan the crowds came to see.

To thunderous cheers, Dylan and his band took the stage silently. Dylan is known for his skilled word craft, but aside from singing, he did not speak a word -- letting the music do the talking.

He opened with a raucous rendition of "Cat's in the Well" and proceeded to take the audience on a journey from one end of the emotional spectrum to the other, transitioning straight into "It Ain't Me, Babe." After that high-energy song, he led into the smooth "Lay, Lady, Lay."

Jumping back to the piano for "Rollin' and Tumblin'," Dylan drew the eye wherever he was without speaking a direct word to the audience.

He switched to harmonica for "My Back Pages," letting the instrument echo the lyrics in a deep twangy voice. Keeping it lively, a bang and a pop from the drums started out "Honest With Me" and set the tone for a sweet and almost bouncy rendition of "Spirit On the Water."
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