Bauhaus

Browse Reviews!

 
Band Summary

Average User Rating 9.15
Total Reviews 2
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
All Concert Photos (click to enlarge)


All User Reviews
 
0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
Bauhaus reunion tour worth the wait
Venue/Date: Warfield Theatre (San Francisco, CA)
Concert Date:  
October 25th, 2005
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.52
Event Date
Tue Oct 25, 2005
Source
San Francisco Chronicle
Concert Review Preview

Get out the black nail polish. The godfathers of Goth are here for Halloween and very undead.

Neva Chonin, Chronicle Critic at Large

If you hold a reunion, they will come. "They," in the case if Tuesday's Bauhaus concert, included three generations of Goths: former Goths, Goths and a smattering of toddling Goths-to-be. What began as an extension of (and reaction to) the '70s punk aesthetic has turned out to be one of the most enduring, and certainly best-dressed, subcultures of the music world, and the regrouping of one of its founding bands was a fine place to celebrate that fact. It was a dark and somewhat somber celebration, but then, black is always the new black.

The history goes like so: Once upon a time, in the post-punk environs of Northampton, England, a group of disenchanted art students with an obsession for glam rock began releasing albums that sounded like David Bowie on a death trip. They called their band Bauhaus. Together with the Cure and Joy Division, Bauhaus -- vocalist Peter Murphy, guitarist Daniel Ash, bassist David Jay and drummer Kevin Haskins -- replaced punk rage with existential melancholy. The era of Reagan and Thatcher began, and so did Goth, because when life's that depressing, a kid has to do something.

Bauhaus broke up in 1983 after four albums. But Goth has rocked on and thrived, providing fertile ground for this, the second Bauhaus reunion tour to hit San Francisco in seven years. In addition to its two Warfield shows, the band also plays the Fillmore on Monday. If you think there's a better place to spend Halloween, you're probably wrong.

For all the enthusiasm, Tuesday's show began dubiously. The deadening thump and plod of "Burning From the Inside" had all the vigor of a crypt door slamming, but was followed by the more beguiling title song from 1980's "In the Flat Field" and then "A God in an Alcove," which let Murphy indulge both his characteristic vocal warble and melodramatic stage persona.

Blond, balding and almost upbeat, Murphy was in fine voice as he led Bauhaus with the wan panache of an undead lounge singer. In a wise move, he's toned down the operatic flailing of the 1998 reunion and replaced it with a repertoire of fey wrist flicks more suitable to a gentleman in his middle years. By contrast, Ash and Jay seem not to have aged at all; perhaps Murphy serves as the band's collective Dorian Gray. He should get a bonus.

The 90-minute set included a career's worth of material, with particular emphasis on the group's first two albums. Among the highlights: the prototypical anthem of doom "She's in Parties," featuring Murphy on melodica; a ragged but glorious "Passion of Lovers"; Jay's funky bass lines of "Kick in the Eye"; and Murphy inexplicably waving a big black stick for the length of "Rosegarden Funeral of Sores," still one of the band's most rocking numbers.

Guitarist Ash, who has enjoyed the most post-breakup success with his bands Tones on Tail and Love and Rockets, took over vocals for "Slice of Life" and delivered an outrageously over-the-top saxophone solo during "In Fear of Fear." His sinewy guitar sounded impressively contemporary as it wound its way around the kinetic tempo of "Terror Couple Kill Colonel."
.
Read rest of Review Here URL
Click here to read rest of the review

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
Bauhaus plays a packed concert crowd
Venue/Date: The Grove of Anaheim (Anaheim, CA)
Concert Date:  
December 9th, 2005
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
8.78

Bauhaus still captivates in comeback

Goth-rock pioneers enthrall diehards in first O.C. show in 7 years, but it didn't get a sellout crowd.

By GEORGE A. PAUL
SPECIAL TO THE REGISTER

Last spring, Coachella organizers got the members of Bauhaus to reunite for the Indio festival.

Smart staging and visual effects, a crisp sound and frontman Peter Murphy's theatrics (he hung upside down like a bat to sing "Bela Lugosi's Dead") all added up to a spectacular performance by the pioneering Goth rock group.

Although it was supposed to be only a one-shot deal, the British musicians apparently had such a great time and the response was so overwhelming, that an American tour was booked.

Unfortunately, the opportunity to witness these alt-rock legends - whose influence can be heard in newcomers such as Interpol, the Bravery and Bloc Party - in an intimate local venue wasn't enough to draw a legion of black-clad followers to The Grove of Anaheim.

Tickets were plentiful and, despite all the freebies, the facility was still only 3/4 full for Bauhaus' first O.C. appearance in seven years (a sold-out late October run at the Wiltern Theatre probably depleted the draw).

Daniel Ash, one of the post-punk era's most inventive axe men, continually displayed his impressive chops on Friday night. Shrouded in dim lighting, he appeared onstage and began a slow churning electric guitar riff to launch the 85-minute set with "Burning from the Inside."

Murphy (tastefully clad in black velvet jacket, dress shirt and slacks) tentatively emerged to croon in his deep baritone. Bassist David J and drummer Kevin Haskins slowly added their parts as the mammoth tune lurched into moody and funky territory.

An intense "In the Flat Field" was driven by Ash's shards-of-glass guitar effects as Murphy frantically wailed and Haskins pounded tribal beats. It was the first of several highlights. The crowd got pumped up when Ash led off an uptempo "In Fear of Fear" (the first of five tunes from 1981's "Mask") with his blaring saxophone and verged on freeform jazz. Even more intriguing was the Middle Eastern vibe in "Terror Couple Kill Colonel.".
Read rest of Review Here URL
Click here to read rest of the review

Was this review helpful to you?